This website uses cookies to function correctly.
You may delete cookies at any time but doing so may result in some parts of the site not working correctly.

Vaccination Schedule

At two months old:

  • Diptheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) (DTaP/IPV/Hib) - one injection
  • Pneumococcal infection - pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) - one injection
  • Rotavirus Infection - Rotavirus vaccine
  • Meningitis (meningoccal type B) - Men B vaccine

At three months old:

  • Diptheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) (DTaP/IPV/Hib) - one injection
  • Rotavirus Infection - Rotavirus vaccine

At four months old:

  • Diptheria, tetanus, polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) (DTaP/IPV/Hib) - one injection
  • Pneumococcal infection - pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) - one injection
  • Meningitis (meningoccal type B) - Men B vaccine

At around 12 months old:

  • Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and meningitis C (Hib/MenC) - booster dose in one injection
  • Meningitis (meningoccal type B) - Men B vaccine
  • Measles, mumps and rubella (German measles) (MMR) - one injection
  • Pneumococcal infection - pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) - one injection

Three years four months to five years old (pre-school):

  • Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough) and polio (dTaP/IPV or DTaP/IPV) - one injection
  • Measles, mumps and rubella (German measles) (MMR) - one injection

Children’s flu vaccination

Protects against: flu

Given : annually as a nasal spray in September/October for ages two, three and four. Also children in years one and two of primary school

HPV vaccine

Given at: all girls aged 12 to 13 are offered HPV (human papilloma virus) vaccination as part of the NHS childhood vaccination programme. The HPV vaccine is delivered largely through secondary schools, and consists of two injections at least six months apart (but no more than 24 months apart).

 Protects against: the human papilloma virus (HPV) is the name given to a family of viruses. In 99% of cases, cervical cancer occurs as a result of a history of infection with high-risk types of HPV. Often, infection with the HPV causes no symptoms.

13 to 18 years old:

  • Diphtheria, tetanus and polio (Td/IPV) - one injection
  • Men ACWY booster vaccine

Optional vaccinations

These vaccinations are offered on the NHS in addition to the routine programme to "at-risk" groups of babies and children.

Chickenpox vaccination (varicella)

Protects against: chickenpox

Who needs it: siblings of children who have suppressed immune systems and are susceptible to chickenpox, for example because they're having cancer treatment or have had an organ transplant

Given: from one year of age upwards (one dose for children from one year to 12 years, two doses given four to eight weeks apart for children aged 13 years or older)

 

Hepatitis B vaccination

Protects against: hepatitis B

 Who needs it: children at high risk of exposure to hepatitis B, and babies born to infected mothers

 Given: at any age, as four doses are given over 12 months – a baby born to a mother infected with hepatitis B will be offered a dose at birth, one month of age, two months of age and one year of age

Flu vaccination

Protects against: flu

Who needs it: children with certain medical conditions or a weakened immune system, which may put them at risk of complications from flu

 

Given: for children between the ages of six months and 2 years as a single jab every year in September/November. For children aged between 2 years up to the age of 17 as a nasal spray every year in September/November

 

BCG (tuberculosis) vaccination (not available in this surgery)

Protects against: tuberculosis

Who needs it: babies and children who have a high chance of coming into contact with tuberculosis

Given: from birth to 16 years of age

 

Call 111 when you need medical help fast but it’s not a 999 emergencyNHS ChoicesThis site is brought to you by My Surgery Website